Integrating high-throughput and computational data elucidates bacterial networks.

TitleIntegrating high-throughput and computational data elucidates bacterial networks.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsCovert MW, Knight EM, Reed JL, Herrgard MJ, Palsson BØ
JournalNature
Volume429
Issue6987
Pagination92-6
PubMed Date2004 May 6
ISSN1476-4687
KeywordsAerobiosis, Anaerobiosis, Computational Biology, Computer Simulation, Escherichia coli, Gene Expression Profiling, Genes, Bacterial, Models, Biological, Phenotype
Abstract

The flood of high-throughput biological data has led to the expectation that computational (or in silico) models can be used to direct biological discovery, enabling biologists to reconcile heterogeneous data types, find inconsistencies and systematically generate hypotheses. Such a process is fundamentally iterative, where each iteration involves making model predictions, obtaining experimental data, reconciling the predicted outcomes with experimental ones, and using discrepancies to update the in silico model. Here we have reconstructed, on the basis of information derived from literature and databases, the first integrated genome-scale computational model of a transcriptional regulatory and metabolic network. The model accounts for 1,010 genes in Escherichia coli, including 104 regulatory genes whose products together with other stimuli regulate the expression of 479 of the 906 genes in the reconstructed metabolic network. This model is able not only to predict the outcomes of high-throughput growth phenotyping and gene expression experiments, but also to indicate knowledge gaps and identify previously unknown components and interactions in the regulatory and metabolic networks. We find that a systems biology approach that combines genome-scale experimentation and computation can systematically generate hypotheses on the basis of disparate data sources.

Alternate JournalNature
PubMed ID15129285

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